fool


fool
fool, idiot, imbecile, moron, simpleton, natural are often used popularly and interchangeably of one regarded as lacking sense or good judgment but each can be more precisely applied to someone mentally deficient in a given degree.
Fool, the most general, can apply to anyone mentally deranged as well as mentally deficient, implying lack or loss of reason or intelligence; it may be used as an extremely offensive term of contempt
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fools rush in where angels fear to tread— Pope

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he was a fool and liable, as such, under the stress of bodily or mental disturbance, to spasmodic fits of abject fright which he mistook for religion— Norman Douglas

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I was a. fool, if you like, and certainly I was going to do a foolish, overbold act— Stevenson

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act like a fool

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Idiot, imbecile, and moron are technical designations for one mentally deficient.
An idiot is incapable of connected speech or of avoiding the common dangers of life and needs constant attendance.
An imbecile is incapable of earning a living but can be educated to attend to simple wants or avoid most ordinary dangers.
A moron can learn a simple trade but requires constant supervision in his work or recreation. In more general and nontechnical use idiot implies utter feeblemindedness, imbecile implies half-wittedness, and moron implies general stupidity
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comes like an idiot, babbling and strewing flowers— Millay

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actually there never is a status quo, except in the minds of political imbecilesHenry Miller

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even morons get college degrees— Warfel

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All three, however, may imply no more than often mild derogation or disapprobation of a person or his conduct
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got a little high at the reunion and made a complete idiot of himself

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how could he have been such a careless imbecile as to mislay his manuscript?— Mackenzie

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the telephone call was a fake . . . and Peeps climbed up into the guard chair, mumbling about the brains of certain moronsBoys' Life

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Simpleton, a term of indulgent contempt, implies silliness or lack of sophistication
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a sweet-natured simpleton who wrote lovely songs for children— Damon

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in spite of her experience of his lying, she had never suspected that that particular statement was a lie. What a simpleton she was!— Bennett

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Natural, which persists chiefly in historical context, may designate any con- genitally feebleminded person
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the man is not a natural; he has a very quick sense, though very slow understanding— Steele

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with the vacant grin of a naturalCharles Gibbon

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New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Fool — Fool, n. [OE. fol, n. & adj., F. fol, fou, foolish, mad; a fool, prob. fr. L. follis a bellows, wind bag, an inflated ball; perh. akin to E. bellows. Cf. {Folly}, {Follicle}.] 1. One destitute of reason, or of the common powers of understanding;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fool — Ⅰ. fool [1] ► NOUN 1) a person who acts unwisely. 2) historical a jester or clown. ► VERB 1) trick or deceive. 2) (fool about/around) act in a joking or frivolous way. 3) …   English terms dictionary

  • fool — fool1 [fo͞ol] n. [ME fol < OFr (Fr fou) < LL follis < L, windbag, bellows: see FOLLICLE] 1. a) a person with little or no judgment, common sense, wisdom, etc.; silly or stupid person; simpleton b) Obs. a mentally retarded person 2. a man …   English World dictionary

  • Fool — steht für: Fool (Süßspeise) April Fool, ein Segelboot The Fool, eine Designergruppe Fool (Roman), Roman von Christopher Moore FOOL steht für: Flughafen Libreville Leon M ba in Gabun (ICAO Code) …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Fool — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Fool Single por Shakira Lanzado 2003 Grabado 2001 Género Rock Duración …   Wikipedia Español

  • Fool — Fool, v. t. 1. To infatuate; to make foolish. Shak. [1913 Webster] For, fooled with hope, men favor the deceit. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. To use as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying manner; to impose upon; to cheat by inspiring… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fool — Fool, n. [Cf. F. fouler to tread, crush. Cf. 1st {Foil}.] A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed, with cream; commonly called gooseberry fool. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fool — Fool, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Fooled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Fooling}.] To play the fool; to trifle; to toy; to spend time in idle sport or mirth. [1913 Webster] Is this a time for fooling? Dryden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fool — [n] stupid or ridiculous person ass, birdbrain*, blockhead*, bonehead*, boob*, bore, buffoon, clod*, clown, cretin*, dimwit*, dolt*, dope*, dumb ox*, dunce, dunderhead*, easy mark*, fair game*, fathead*, goose*, halfwit, idiot, ignoramus,… …   New thesaurus

  • fool — index bilk, deceive, defraud, delude, dupe, ensnare, entrap, evade (deceive), illude …   Law dictionary


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